One Year To Live

Irvin J. Boudreaux:

A fantastic story!!

Originally posted on Morning Story and Dilbert:

Morning Story and Dilbert

Vintage Dilbert
October 30, 2014

Anthony Burgess was 40 when he learned that he had only one year to live. He had a brain tumor that would kill him within a year. He know he had a battle on his hands. He was completely broke at the time, and he didn’t have anything to leave behind for his wife, Lynne, soon to be a window.

Burgess had never been a professional novelist in the past, but he always knew the potential was inside him to be a writer. So, for the sole purpose of leaving royalties behind for his wife, he put a piece of paper into a typewriter and began writing. He had no certainty that he would even be published, but he couldn’t think of anything else to do.

“It was January of 1960,” he said, “and according to the prognosis, I had a winter and spring and…

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Let the Son Show the Way

“While my friend always spoke about the sun, I kept speaking about the clouds, until one day I realized that it was the sun that allowed me to see the clouds.”
   

—Henri Nouwen

What will your topic of conversation be today?

 

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Pleasing God

Someone asked Abba Anthony, “What must one do in order to please God?” The old man replied, “Pay attention to what I tell you: whoever you may be, always have God before your eyes, whatever you do, do it according to the testimony of the Holy Scriptures; in whatever place you live do not easily leave it. Keep these three precepts and you will be saved.”

—–Antony of Egypt

ALWAYS HAVE GOD BEFORE YOUR EYESanthony_egypt

This statement begs the question, how do we always have God before our eyes? God is before our eyes when we worship and pray. The monk is telling us that our lives should be bathed in worship and prayer. In these practices we can find the face and heart of God.

WHATEVER YOU DO, DO IT ACCORDING TO THE TESTIMONY OF THE HOLY SCRIPTURES

The Psalmist writes, children sing -“the Bible is a lamp unto my and a light unto my path.” The monk advises that this simple instruction is one of the keys to pleasing God. Today’s world seems to have neither light or path. Antony steers us to the lighted path of Holy Scripture.

WHATEVER PLACE YOU LIVE DO NOT EASILY LEAVE IT.

Monks call this one stability. Our transient, temporary society is floundering for lack of stability. Marriages crumble, jobs are abandoned, work goes unfinished, all because we are not willing to commit ourselves to being in for the long haul. Pleasing God requires that we develop stay power – the type that settles us in long enough to walk through the valley that precedes the mountain.

The words of this monk of old can take us a long way today.

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Prayer of a Soul Taken with Love

Lord God, my Beloved, if you still remember my sins in such a way that you do not do what I beg of you, do your will concerning them, my God, which is what I most desire, and exercise your goodness and mercy, and you will be known St. john of the Crossthrough them. And if you are waiting for my good works so as to hear my prayer through their means, grant them to me, and work them for me, and the sufferings you desire to accept, and let it be done. But if you are not waiting for my works, what is it that makes you wait, my most clement Lord? Why do you delay? For if, after all, I am to receive the grace and mercy that I entreat of you in your Son, take my mite, since you desire it, and grant me this blessing, since you also desire that. Who can free themselves from lowly manners and limitations if you do not lift them to yourself, my God, in purity of love? How will human beings begotten and nurtured in lowliness rise up to you, Lord, if you do not raise them with your hand that made them? You will not take from me, my God, what you once gave me in your only Son, Jesus Christ, in whom you gave me all I desire. Hence I rejoice that if I wait for you, you will not delay. With what procrastinations do you wait, since from this very moment you can love God in your heart? Mine are the heavens and mine is the earth. Mine are the nations, the just are mine, and mine the sinners. The angels are mine, and the Mother of God, and all things are mine; and God himself is mine and for me, because Christ is mine and all for me. What do you ask, then, and seek, my soul? Yours is all of this, and all is for you. Do not engage yourself in something less or pay heed to the crumbs that fall from your Father’s table. Go forth and exult in your Glory! Hide yourself in it and rejoice, and you will obtain the supplications of your heart.

——John of the Cross

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A Point

Why does the Bible, and why does Jesus, tell us to care for the poor and the outsider? It is because we all need to stand in that position for our own conversion. We each need to stand under the mercy of God, the forgiveness of God, and the grace of God—to understand the very nature of reality. When we are too smug and content, then grace and mercy have no meaning—and God has no meaning. Forgiveness is not even desired. When we have pulled ourselves up by our own bootstraps, religion is always corrupted because it doesn’t understand the mystery of how divine life is transferred, how people change, and how life flows. It has been said by others that religion is largely filled with people who are afraid of hell, and spirituality is for people who have gone through hell.

Irish CrossJesus is always on the side of the crucified ones. He is not loyal to one religion, or this or that group, or the “worthy” ones—Jesus is loyal to suffering itself, wherever it is. He is just as loyal to the suffering of Iraqis or Afghanis as he is to the suffering of Americans. He is just as loyal to an oppressed gay man as he is to an oppressed married woman. We do not like that! He grabs all of our self-created boundaries away from us, and suddenly all we have is a free fall into the arms of God, who is our only and solid security. This seems to be God’s very surprising agenda, if I am to believe the Bible.

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A Bright Sadness

There is a gravitas in the second half of life, but it is now held up by a much deeper lightness, or “okayness.” Our mature years are characterized by a kind of bright sadness and a sober happiness, if that makes any sense. There is still darkness in the second half of life—in fact maybe even more. But there is now a changed capacity to hold it creatively and with less anxiety. It is what John of the Cross called “luminous darkness,” and it explains the simultaneous coexistence of deep suffering and intense joy that we see in the saints, which is almost impossible for most of us to imagine.

Life is much more spacious now, the boundaries of the container having been enlarged by the constant addition of new experiences and relationships. You are like an expandable suitcase, and you became so almost without your noticing. Now you are just here, and here holds more than enough. Such “hereness,” however, has its own heft, authority, and influence.

One’s growing sense of infinity and spaciousness is no longer found just “out there” but most especially “in here.” The inner and the outer have become one. You can trust your inner experience now, because even God has allowed it, used it, received it, and refined it. As St. Augustine dramatically put it in his Confessions:

You were within, but I was without. You were with me, but I was not with you. So you called, you shouted, you broke through my deafness, you flared, blazed, and banished my blindness, you lavished your fragrance, and I gasped.

— Richard Rhor

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Potent Prayer

“The most potent and acceptable prayer is the prayer that leaves the best effects. I don’t mean it must immediately fill the soul with desire . . . The best effects [are] those that are followed up by actions—–when the soul not only desires the honor of God, but really strives for it. “

—-Teresa of Avila

prayer young man 1Prayer must be more than offering to God your requests for actions you wish Him to take on your behalf. Teresa says ” potent” prayer effects actions that are taken by you. Whether this is the reversal of a bad habit  or the beginning of a new form of ministry, the action is yours to take. God wants His people to be people of prayer and actions that make their prayers effective. He provides us with the ability to recognize the results.

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Augustine on Scripture

augustine-quotes-3

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October 21, 2014 · 4:33 pm

Seeing God

If therefore we seek Jesus, the word, we must be able to see Him in theautumn-forest created things around us – in the hills, the fields, the flowers, the birds and animals that he has created, in the sky and the trees. We must be able to see him in nature. Nature is no obstacle to our contact with him, if we know how to use it.

—-Thomas Merton

Most of you who read this blog are seeking Jesus even if it is from the perspective of a doubter. Many people go through great lengths to prove the existence, or non-existence, of God. Merton writes these words to young men who were seeking to live the life of a monastic in the day when the rules were tighter than most of us can imagine. He was the novice master of a Cistercian (Strict Observance) Abbey. These young men were seeking to commit themselves to a truly other worldly life. When one approaches such a task, it is only natural for him to want an anchor to grasp. I am sure the young looked with great desire to Merton to provide this for them. He, instead, told them to look to nature, the hills, the trees, created things, and therein they could find what eluded them. The great qualifier was knowing how to use this knowledge.

For all of us the real challenge is to learn how to use the creation for the glory of God. When we see a majestic wild animal, do we see something that must be conquered, or is it a gift from God? Does God’s creation give us a glimpse of Him?

In God’s conversation with Job, He said: “Where were you when I laid the foundation of the earth? Tell me, if you have understanding. Who determined its measurements—surely you know! Or who stretched the line upon it? On what were its bases sunk, or who laid its cornerstone when the morning stars sang together and all the heavenly beings shouted for joy?”

Job, like us, had many questions about God and how He interacts with us, but God challenged Job with nature. He was paralyzed by this challenge and had to admit that God was far more than he could have ever imagined. Take the time to see God in the sunset. Remember, He is the creator and sustainer of all things. God is not simply a cerebral belief: He is an active partner in your everyday life.

Prayer Thought – Lord let me see you in all that you have created. Help me to see your loving hands in all that surrounds me. Like the hands of the skillful artist, you have given me the beauty of your being. You are my Creator and God. Amen

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Making a Difference

English: The church of SS Andrew and Mary - St...

Our Lord God wills that we have great regard to all the deeds that He has done: in the great nobleness of the making of all things; and the excellency of man’s making, which is above all his works; and the precious Amends(intercessions) that He has made for man’s sin, turning all our blame into endless worship. In which also our Lord says: Behold and see! For by the same Might, Wisdom, and Goodness that I have done all this, by the same Might, Wisdom, and Goodness I shall make well all that is not well; and thou shalt see it. And in this He wills that we keep us in the Faith and truth of Holy Church, not desiring to see into His secret things now, save as it belongs to us in this life

—–Julian of Norwich

In this thought Julian tells us of the great work of Jesus our redeemer and invites us to make a difference in our world. We must ask ourselves:

  • What is it that we are making well?
  • Does our touch make a positive difference in the world?
  • Do we do our best to help make those we touch better persons?
  • Do we learn from the goodness of others?

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