God is Everywhere

Abba Doulas, the disciple of Abba Bessarion said, ‘One day when we were walking beside the sea I was thirsty and I said to Abba Bessarion, “Father, I am very thirsty.” He said a prayer and said to me, “Drink some of the sea water.” The water proved sweet when I drank some. I even poured some into a leather bottle for fear of being thirsty later on. Seeing this, the old man asked me why I was taking some. I said to him, “Forgive me, it is for fear of being thirsty later on.” Then the old man said, “God is here, God is everywhere.” ‘

——sayings of the desert

In life many of us turn to a mentor or guide for some words of wisdom. With so many situations that make us feel utterly helpless, the comfort of our spiritual companion is quite strengthening. Brother Doulas has a simple request – water. Thirst would be a common sensation in the desert. The men and women who went to the desert were well aware that the land would be arid and isolated. The guide Abba Doulas sought out began to fulfill his request by praying. In that prayer a way was found to quench his thirst.

What happens next is a bit of a surprise. Doulas drinks sea water and it is “sweet.” Only God can make salt water into fresh water. His thirst was quenched by God in a dramatically direct way. Quite naturally, Doulas wanted to prepare for the future by taking a skin of water, but the Abba saw it differently. He uttered the mystical words – “God is everywhere.” Do we really believe that?

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Much of our lives is spent preparing for things that never happen, imagining problems that never come to be, all because we fail to see that God is with us no matter what. We are not called to live a life of careless neglect, but we would do well to remember that He walks along side of us wherever we go. In our belief that God is everywhere we find the strength to accomplish the impossible. We can never carry enough “water” to quench our thirst at all times, he journey of life is made less burdensome when we truly believe God is everywhere.

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Filed under Christian Living, Desert Fathers, Monasticism

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