Pleasures vs. Prayers

abba_anthony

 

” He said also, ‘just as fish die if they stay too long out of water, so the monks who loiter outside their cells or pass their time with men of the world lose the intensity of inner peace. So like a fish going towards the sea, we must hurry to reach our cell, for fear that if we delay outside we will lose our interior watchfulness.”

Abba Anthony—-Sayings of the Desert Fathers

I would venture to say that very few of us that will read this are monks. Nevertheless, the challenge is very clear. Christians who spend the bulk of their time seeking pleasure from material things will find themselves in spiritual distress. Take the lesson from the wisdom of the fathers,and spend some time each day in the things of God.

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4 Comments

Filed under Desert Fathers

4 responses to “Pleasures vs. Prayers

  1. I for one am able to relate to this. When I allow secular life to increase the time between masses and other forms of spiritual contemplation, I feel something which I might describe as a weakening spirit.
    In more practical terms, it is easier to allow secular thoughts and life interfere with my internal awareness, when I have engaged less in spiritual contemplation, than I do otherwise; spiritual contemplation seems to add to my resiliency.
    And for me, I do not find Protestant forms of worship fill this gap. I am certain this says more about my personal psychology, and what form of worship is more affective for *me* than it says anything pro or con about high church (bells & smells) vs low church (teaching & preaching) services in an of themselves.
    Yet, it remains true for me, and by extension, I’m convinced it does for many persons. This is, of course, also one of the arguments in favor of the Jesus Prayer in the Orthodox observation.
    I find where I choose to spend my thoughts, does have an effect upon my spiritual life, or my apprehension thereof.

  2. Reblogged this on Hopeful and commented:
    A wonderful less on spending some time each day in the things of God. Thank you Irvin J. Boudreaux!

  3. Pingback: Pleasures vs. Prayers - the MethoBlog

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