Category Archives: Image of God

Born Again = Imago Dei

Imago Dei – A theological term, applied uniquely to humans, which denotes the symbolical relation between God and humanity.

There is in us an instinct for newness, for renewal, for a liberation of creative power. We seek to awaken in ourselves a force which really changes our lives from within. And yet the same instinct tells us that this change is a recovery of that which is deepest, most original, most personal in ourselves. To be born again is not to become somebody else, but to become ourselves.

THOMAS MERTON

You don’t have a Soul. You are a Soul. You have a body.

–C. S. Lewis

So God created mankind in his own image, in the image of God he created them; male and female he created them.

–Genesis 1:27

Thomas-Merton-5-17-17


I was a college student when I really understood the concept of “born again” for first time. I was very intrigued at the idea and began to probe just what it meant. As I looked inward I saw myself as a very faithful Christian. From a very early age I had gone to church, tried to live a good life and obeyed the rules, but I began to wonder if there was something more. To makes matters worse, President Jimmy Carter burst on the scene and began telling everyone (even Playboy Magazine) about his new birth experience. In the mid-seventies it seemed that the country was a buzz talking about being born again. With great evangelical fervor I was born again and left my Roman Catholic heritage for the brave new world of the evangelical movement.

At first I thought I had arrived and was standing boldly on the pinnacle of spiritual development. Soon afterwards I reaffirmed a vocational ministry calling and I was off to Seminary. After graduating and becoming the pastor of a country church, my one goal was to make sure everyone was “born again” just like me. After a decade or so of saving the world, I found that it just wasn’t working. Was the new birth really the end all and be all of the spiritual journey? Early on in my spiritual journey (my pre-born again days) I had been fascinated by the monastic life -so much so that I gave serious consideration to becoming a monk myself. But that soon fizzled. I still felt sure about my “new birth” experience, but something was amiss.

CS Lewis 5-17-17That feeling led me to Henri Nouwen, Thomas Merton, Anthony DeMello, C. S. Lewis, the Desert Abbas and Ammas and many others where I discovered what I should have already known – that I was created in the image of God. The new birth is merely a rediscovery of what was already there hiding inside of me. Long ago God had planted a “spark of divinity” in me and through my born again experience I was simply becoming my true self in the weak and frail body that I have in this life. C. S. Lewis said, “You don’t have a Soul. You are a Soul. You have a body.”

I, like so many others, thought that being born again was to become some new creature. I misinterpreted Paul’s words when he said,” Therefore if any man be in Christ, he is a new creature: old things are passed away; behold, all things are become new.” Christ followers are the same people they were before, they just have a recognition of the Creator within them. Suddenly the “IMAGO DEI” comes alive through the work of the Holy Spirit, and we can do all things through the strength of Christ.

The wonderful words of Thomas Merton – “To be born again is not to become somebody else, but to become ourselves” are such a blessing. Because of that concept I can tell myself and the world that God never abandons us. Yes, He lets us do our own thing, but He is always there. Our world is full of people that feel there is no God or at the very best, He has abandoned His creation. High rates of crime, suicides, depression, bullying are some things that happen when we forget that God created all of us in His image. Yes, we must be “born again” by acknowledging that we belong to God and allowing Him to flourish in us.

Let us ALL become our true selves.


Prayer

Lord, give me a newness of life today. Let me see your shining light in me and all others. Let my life be filled with your glory as I see your light all around me today. Help me to be born again and again. Let this new birth be a daily routine as I seek to follow You every day of my life.

Amen

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The Long Journey

Drawing of the Crucifixion by St. John of the ...

Drawing of the Crucifixion by St. John of the Cross 

 Where have you hidden,

Beloved, and left me moaning?

you fled like the stag

after wounding me;

I went out calling you, but you were gone.

 —-Canticle of John of the Cross Stanza 1

God has hidden His true self from us is the first cry of the soul. Indeed every seeker of God longs for the mystical presence because in such a presence we can touch the hand of God. John tells us in his canticle that such a presence is hidden from us. The long journey of the believer is to find that level of the spiritual which is concealed from us by asking God to manifest His divine essence to us. The search for the divine leaves us moaning. We are left in a state of grief because the quest is so elusive. Victory does not come to he who prays the most or the loudest.

The mere wisp of the touch of God flees from us us as quickly as the cautious deer when he sites a man. We get a little glimpse of God, and it wounds us because we want so much more of Him. We call after Him and we cannot find Him. All manner of prayer and sacred reading is this search for the essence of God in the here and now. In John’s canticle I feel a sense of urgency and determination that are vital elements to a true relationship with God.

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Filed under contemplative, Dark Night of the Soul, Devotional Quotes, Image of God, John of the Cross, Mystics, Persistance, Spiritual Seekers

A Name or Image

English: Monochrome version of the IHS emblem ...

The Jesuit priest and modern mystic Anthony de Mello said: “Every word, every image used for God is a distortion more than a description.”  That is a very thought provoking assertion. The implication is that man is totally incapable of truly having a clear grasp of the might and majesty of God. Perhaps that in itself gives is a very clear picture of God.

Men have spent untold hours, written thousands of books, given sermons and lectures, all trying to fit God in our own little box. In all this, He eludes the words and thoughts of the wisest and greatest among us. Every time we have him figured out, He pops a new surprise on us. A single name or thought about God is impossible.

How can we begin to capture the one who hung the moon and the stars with a simple name? Perhaps the best answer is to admit He is our ultimate mystery. In our allowing Him to be mysterious, we discover a small portion of His power and might.

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