Tag Archives: Latin

Give Me Your Sins

Jerome was a hermit, priest, and father of the church who guided the church as it translated the Bible from Greek to Latin, the language of the people. Jerome wanted the people to read and know the Bible. He lived in Bethlehem for a time to get a feel of how Jesus lived during his earthly journey. Oral tradition tells us that while living in Bethlehem, Jerome had a dream that Jesus visited him. TheJesus Quote 7-15.14 - 1 dream was so real that he rounded up all his material blessings and offered them to Jesus. He heard the Lord declare, “I do not want your possessions.” So being a good church leader, he offered all his money to Jesus. Jesus once again declared, “I do not want your money.” Finally, in desperation, Jerome cried out, “Jesus, what do you want from me?” Jesus simply replied, “Give me your sins. That is what I came for–I came to take away your sin. Give me your sin.”

That’s really what it’s is all about. Jesus wants our sins! He asks us to love and trust Him enough to be able to give all to Him. Our Lord asks us to confess the unforgivable and feel the warmth of His grace. Many of us are far too busy trying to impress God when all He wants is for us to trust in His promise. That promise is: “Come to me, all you that are weary and are carrying heavy burdens, and I will give you rest.” As we bring our sins, He offers His rest. Jerome had it right, all Jesus wants is our sins.

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Filed under Devotional, Jesus, Sin

The Alphabet of a Peasant

Latin Alphabet

Latin Alphabet (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

One day Abba Arsenius consulted an old Egyptian monk about his own thoughts.   Someone noticed this and said to him, ‘Abba Arsenius, how is it that you with such a good Latin and Greek education ask this peasant about your thoughts?’ He replied, ‘I have indeed been taught Latin and Greek, but I do not know even the alphabet of this peasant.’

 ——Abba Arsenius

What an interesting thought, “The alphabet of a peasant.” We all know that everything we write or say comes from our alphabet. How amazing was it that a highly educated Roman citizen, when looking through the eyes of Christ, gave more credence to the wisdom of the peasant than the wisdom of education. The challenge is: Who do we learn from? Who sets our agenda? Can any of us say that we listen and learn from those who are living through the pure mercy of God.

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Filed under Desert Fathers, missional, Missional Living, Monasticism